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Super similes
Wednesday 17th October
The Year 1 students have been studying writing techniques used by children’s author Mem Fox. 1C learnt that Mem Fox uses similes to help develop a picture of the book’s characters in the...
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Year 5 go Swimming
Wednesday 17th October
As part of our Education Outside of the Classroom (EOTC) Kristin Junior School is partaking in their annual swimming lessons. The swimming season is upon us…5B travelled by bus to the...
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North Harbour Hockey U15 win
Wednesday 17th October
Huge congratulations to Finn Burridge and Kevin Wei who both won hockey Nationals with the North Harbour U15 team in the holidays. We look forward to seeing what they achieve next.
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Middle School Sports Leaders
Tuesday 16th October
Last term our Middle School Sports committee engaegd in a 6 week training programme with Wairau Valley Special School and Glenfield College special needs department. The aim was to prepare...
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Ski Racing Success
Wednesday 3rd October
Mikayla Smyth Year 9 has continued on her winning way, dominating the results at the at National Championships held at Cardrona in the South Island. New Zealand Youth Series: - 1st...
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Snowboard Success
Thursday 27th September
Congratulations to Juliette Perera who won the Giant Slalom and the North Island Snowboard Championships. This was an outstanding effort in difficult conditions, there was a large...
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Year 6 Exhibition 2018
Wednesday 26th September
Year 6 have spent Term 3 working towards their PYP Exhibition Inquiry, and what an exciting, challenging and busy term it has been. This year the children were able to pick issues that...
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Wheels Day
Wednesday 26th September
The Junior School Student Council organised a Wheels Day on Wednesday 12 September. The Student Council, with the aid of Mr Hutton, Mrs Harris, and many other selfless teachers, worked...
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Kristin Golf Championships
Tuesday 25th September
Yesterday we held the annual Kristin Golf Championships, we had six boys and six girls entered. The weather was incredibly changeable from heavy rain and high winds to lovely warm...
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North Island Ski Champs
Friday 21st September
After some appalling weather on the Monday and Tuesday, racing finally went ahead on the Wednesday. After all the rain from the previous days the snow condition was extremely poor being...
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İçiçe Portletler

« Geri

Grit Matters

by Tim Oughton, Executive Principal

One of the most famous behavioural experiments of the 20th century was carried out at Stanford University in 1972. A marshmallow was offered to children on the understanding that if they could resist eating the marshmallow, they would receive two later on. How long each child resisted the temptation was carefully noted. The study drew fascinating conclusions. Children who were able to delay gratification at age four were significantly more competent, achieved higher standardised test scores and were more successful across a wide range of criteria.

Children who were most impulsive at age four went on to score an average of 524 in verbal and 528 in math on the SAT test. Those who controlled their impulses scored an average of 610 in verbal and 652 in math. It is hard to believe that this astounding difference was predicted on the basis of a marshmallow! In fact, this response turns out to be twice as good at predicting success than IQ tests.

Less well known is a follow-up to this experiment carried out by researchers at the University of Rochester in 2012. In this experiment, before offering the marshmallows, the children were split into two groups. The first group was given a number of 'unreliable experiences' before the marshmallow test. For instance, the researchers promised to give the children certain things but never did. The second group was given a number of 'reliable experiences'. For instance, whenever the children were promised something, it actually happened.

When the marshmallow experiment was then carried out, the impact was predictable but fascinating. The children who had unreliable experiences beforehand had no reason to trust the researchers and ate the marshmallow before waiting for a second one. The children in the group who had reliable experiences beforehand saw the advantages of delayed gratification and waited for the second marshmallow.

In other words, the children’s ability to demonstrate self-control was strongly influenced by the experiences that surrounded them. Just a few minutes was enough to nudge the children one way or another.

There are two important lessons here. First, if our children are to succeed, they will need to develop the ability to defer gratification.

This is the ability to choose to do something harder than to choose to do something much easier. Second (and most importantly), our children can develop greater self-control and the ability to delay gratification if they’re in an environment which is reliable, predictable and delivers on what it promises.

The remarkable link between impulse control and success points us to a deeper wisdom – that the path of least resistance is not always the best path and that the benefits of sticking with something difficult and challenging can yield a greater reward. According to University of Pennsylvania psychologist, Angela Duckworth, this ability to stick with things (what she calls 'grit') matters more in achieving our full potential than intelligence, skill, or even grades. So, how do we develop 'grit' at Kristin?

• We deliberately offer young people challenges knowing full well that some of the challenges will be daunting.

• We actively promote perseverance by holding young people firmly to the commitments they make.

• We encourage young people to try even if we know it may lead to failure (and we gladly allow them to experience disappointment).

• We work hard to create a 'reliable environment' at Kristin – one where promises are kept and individuals are urged to stay true to their word.